Frequently Asked Questions


Ordering
How do I order a Homewood stove?
So you have a waiting list?
Can we talk to some satisfied customers?
Where can we see a Homewood stove in operation?
How much do your stoves cost?
How much does a flue cost?
How long is a Homewood Stove guaranteed for?
I don’t live in New Zealand, do you export to…?

Installation
How does a Homewood stove get installed?
How do I get my stove?
Am I allowed a Homewood stove in my area?
What’s the home heating capacity of your stoves?
What’s the hot water heating capacity of your stoves?
Can your stoves run radiators?
What size hot water cylinder do we need for the Homewood?

Operation
Can a Homewood burn all night?
Is it environmentally friendly or responsible to burn wood?

Terminology
Where I’m from a stove is just for heating – you must be meaning cooker?
Er, what’s a ‘wetback’…?
So what’s the difference between a wetback and a boiler?


Ordering

How can I order a Homewood stove?
You send us an email, or give us a call! We’ll talk to you about when you’d like your stove, and work out which batch to include you in.
For full ordering information, go here.

So you have a waiting list?
Yes, we do. But so long as you’re thinking far enough ahead with your plans, we can normally fit in with people’s construction or renovation schedule. If you have only just discovered us and are wanting one right away do get in touch – it’s possible we might be able to accommodate you! In either case, send us an email.

Can we talk to some satisfied customers?
Absolutely! Email us with your request and we will send you some phone numbers or email addresses of customers who will be happy to talk to you about their Homewood; I may even be able to connect you with someone who lives nearby and is happy to show off their stove to you! We also have a growing list of testimonials (with pictures of various installations!) that you can read, right here on our website.

Where can we see a Homewood stove in operation?
The stoves can be viewed at our workshop or at our home up here in Whangarei, Northland (details here!); occasionally at various field days or home shows (information will be posted on our home page and on our Facebook page); or at the homes of customers throughout New Zealand who have kindly offered to show off their stove to people who are interested.

If you want to see a stove in action (and we really do encourage it – photos and even videos can’t quite capture the magic of a warm stove that comes alive with a glowing fire!), send us an email and we’ll see what we can arrange for you in your area.

How much do your stoves cost?
Homewood Heritage: $11,440 + GST
Homewood Matriarch: $17,860 + GST
Homewood Companion: $8,500 + GST
All prices are in New Zealand Dollars! Goods and Services Tax is 15% (NZ only).

How much does a flue cost?
The price of a flue kit depends on the height of your roof/angles etc. An average price for a flue kit would be around $500 – your plumber or local heat shop can sort you out, or you can get one from us. We don’t manufacture flues ourselves, but can source them for you to suit your requirements: just send us an email.

How long is a Homewood Stove guaranteed for?
All our stoves are guaranteed for FIVE years against defective materials and sub-standard workmanship, provided all installation, operation and maintenance directions are correctly followed.

I don’t live in New Zealand, do you export to…?
A very tentative maybe.

As at January, 2016, we are still only producing and selling for the New Zealand market. However we have been looking into individual, case-by-case exports, and while they may involve fairly high costs for one-offs, it just might be possible.
If you’re dead keen, feel free to send us an email, and we can advise you further.
If you’re in Australia, the good news is that there are already fully compliant with your national regulations, as they have been tested under our shared AS/NZS standard.

Installation

How does a Homewood stove get installed?
Grab a copy of our installation specifications from our downloads page, print it out and give it a full read: there’s plenty of useful information that will go a long way to help during the planning stage.
The actual installation process is not complicated, but must be done correctly. It’s a matter of preparing the area (any concreting, tiling or brickwork), moving the stove into place, confirming safe installation clearances, having your plumber connect the wetback pipes, and installing a flue.
Installation costs depend on how much preparatory work you can do yourself, the simplicity or complexity of your installation, and the hourly rate of your plumber and his speed! If everything is prepared, it doesn’t take long to manoeuvre the stove into place and have the plumber attach the wetback connections.
We are very happy to offer you individual advice and guidance on your installation, so get in touch if you have any questions.

How do I get my stove?
You can collect it yourself from our workshop in Whangarei, otherwise we transport our stoves throughout New Zealand using Mainfreight. They can either deliver the stove straight to your door, or to the Mainfreight depot closest to you, depending on which you would prefer.

To your door is generally more expensive and requires coordinating with the truck driver; depot collections can be done at your convenience and are usually a fair bit cheaper, but require access to a ute or trailer – we provide quotes for either options.

Read this article for full delivery and manoeuvring advice.

Am I allowed a Homewood stove in my area?
Cooking stoves (all Homewood stoves are cookers) are completely exempt (and actually excluded!) from the emissions testing requirements and associated restrictions under the Australia/New Zealand National Standard, so in theory can be installed anywhere, nationwide.
However, some local councils (eg: Christchurch) have imposed extra regulations, over and beyond the National Standard that may restrict your ability to install a cooking stove. Please see this page for more information.

What’s the home heating capacity of your stoves?
The Homewood Companion will heat a well-insulated area of up to 125m2 (8 – 10 kW)
The Homewood Heritage will heat a well-insulated area of up to 150m2 (10 – 12 kW)
The Homewood Matriarch will heat a well-insulated area of up to 175m2 (12 – 14 kW)

What’s the hot water heating capacity of your stoves?
The Homewood Companion has a wetback output of 3 – 4 kW
The Homewood Heritage has a wetback output of 4 – 5 kW
The Homewood Matriarch has a wetback output of 5 – 6 kW

The Heritage can instead be fitted with an advanced wetback that increases hot water output to 8 – 9 kW if you are planning to run more extensive radiator/underfloor heating systems.

Can your stoves run radiators? Underfloor heating?
Yes! There are plenty of Homewoods out there running radiators, we just advise caution before setting up too many. Our stoves are first and foremost cooking ranges, so we are wary to give the go-ahead for large-scale radiator/underfloor heating set-ups.

As a general idea, they should each happily run:
The Companion – up to 1-2 panels at 1 kW ea
The Heritage – up to 3-4 panels at 1 kW ea
The Matriarch – up to 4-5 panels at 1 kW ea
when running a thermostat-controlled system.

As above, the Heritage can instead be fitted with an advanced wetback that increase the output and can run around 7 or so panels at 1 kW ea.

We strongly recommend a thermostat-controlled system (which can have manual overrides), as they regulate the circulating pump to switch on and send heat to the radiators at (say) 80 C, so your cylinder never boils, and then switch off at (say) below 65 C, so you’re never caught short of domestic hot water when you’re wanting a shower!

Every set-up is different (size and location of panels); grab our installation specifications and involve a knowledgeable plumber or central heating expert during the planning stage!

What size hot water cylinder do we need for the Homewood?
We recommend a cylinder at least 220 litres, but bigger is generally better. See our installation specifications for a full break down on hot water systems.

Operation

Can a Homewood Stove burn all night?
Yes! Sure can, even the smaller Companion runs all night!

Many of our Southern customers keep their stove in constant use, only letting it die down for cleaning. You just need to establish a good bed of embers on which to place a large, dry piece of hardwood for the night. For customers at the colder ends of the country, this is an important asset. For those of us in the North, it’s not so crucial – especially with how easy the Homewood is to light. More details can be found in our operating manuals.

Is it environmentally friendly or responsible to burn wood?
Yes, assuming that you’re properly operating an efficient, modern wood stove like any of the Homewood models, with dry, well-seasoned wood. Burning wood is carbon neutral, 100% renewable and more sustainable than almost any other form of energy.

Though the stoves we make can run coal, they are first and foremost designed as wood burners with large fireboxes, and function amazingly on wood alone.

Terminology

Where I’m from a stove is just for heating – you must be meaning cooker?
We’re aware that in other parts of the world what we in NZ call a ‘stove’ is instead referred to as a cooker, a wood cooker, a range, a cooking range or even a cook stove; while plain old ‘stove’ is reserved for solid fuel heaters, which here in NZ we just call fires, space heaters, or simply fireplaces.
Not sure how New Zealand ended up having it opposite to much of the world, but can’t help thinking we have it the right way around – after all, you wouldn’t call an electric oven a ‘cooker’ nor an electric heater a ‘stove’: you’d call them a stove and a heater, so why then reverse it for stoves and heaters that burn wood?

Er, what’s a ‘wetback’…?
Here in NZ, a ‘wetback’ is what we call the thing in the back of the firebox that has water cycling through it getting heated. It’s what you North American’s might call a water jacket or water heater.

So what’s the difference between a wetback and a boiler?
A boiler usually has industrial application, and normally refers to a high pressure system that is producing steam. Wetbacks or water jackets are low pressure systems that produce hot water only.

Have a question not on this list? Send us an email – we’re happy to help!



More information:
Our stoves
Ordering your Homewood
Feedback from our customers
Frequently asked questions
Get in touch with Homewood Stoves

Print, Share or Bookmark:
  • share on Facebook
  • Email to a friend
  • Bookmark this page
  • Print